Our latest updates

Thats All Media Blog

Read our Blog

The Power of Hashtags

Whether we like them or not:  hashtags have become an essential part of social media culture over the past decade. What started off as a complimentary ending to a witty tweet has now become one of the top ways to enhance campaigns online.  At That’s All Media, we actively encourage our clients to harness and utilise its power. Its value can make a fundamental difference to campaigns, especially those located in smaller parts of the country. Here’s three ways how to fully embrace the power of the hashtag:

 

Free Publicity

Free Publicity

Hosting events for a campaign can prove very expensive. However, promoting and capturing the impact of the event can be even more taxing on expenses. By using a hashtag which entails the name of your event or has some relation to its outcome, small campaigners can create an immediate online presence without spending a penny.

It will also enhance the audience experience of the event or campaign. It’s now a cultural norm to document your life through selfies or videos. By the audience hash-tagging an event; it creates an internet trail across social media which can never be erased. Raw, positive reactions sell better than scripted adverts. Adding a hashtag to this marketing technique is one of the quickest ways of boosting your campaign without hiring a media team.

 

Merge the old with the new

Old to New

Although the hashtag is a direct descendant of the internet, it is now perfectly acceptable to use hashtags in spaces that are offline. Multiple brands such as Three, Samsung and Natwest have used hashtags on physical, hard copies of flyers or on billboards. This acts as a two-strand marketing strategy. Its slogan-like quality appeals to those who are not active on the internet and it also directs people to your social media accounts. This is another impactful way of turning an ordinary hashtag into a movement.

 

Accountability and Social Change

Make a change

Lastly, hashtags are a brilliant way of holding brands, causes and public figures accountable for their actions. In recent years, powerful movements such as #MeToo and #ClimateDenier have put the spotlight on industry gatekeepers and those abusing their positions. In essence, hashtags can give power back to underrepresented communities and deliver justice into the hands of its rightful owners.

Hashtags can transcend the reach of a small campaign onto a global playing field in a matter of seconds, but are local brands embracing the power of the hashtag? Everyone can benefit from its uses regardless of your background. The small things can make the biggest difference. 

Written by Ashlee E L Roberts for That’s All Media

 

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help campaigns & campaigners raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and audio (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more information about all of our services, please contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter, Linked In and Instagram

4 Ways Organisations Can Engage Young People

One-quarter of the world’s population is made up of young people, and almost one-quarter of knife crimes have been committed by the youth. 60% of those who are caught with a knife has been under 25 years old in London; the city with the most populated knife-related crimes. The West Midlands is second. A lot of these incidences have been assumed to be gang-related.

When thinking of people armed with knives, their automatic response is to let the justice system sort it out. But these are young people are exposed to violence because there is not  enough youth engagement to keep them from getting caught up in the danger. They look for friendship, support, and independence but there’s a lack of trust and so engagement is being cut away. There has been a 38% reduction in funds what would have helped these young people. Without youth engagement, the risk of the annual count of knife crimes involving youth will most likely increase from 6500.

Since baby boomers have taken up most of the population it is becoming harder for young people to find jobs. Especially with the criticism that young people aren’t working hard enough. It isn’t because they don’t work hard enough, it’s because they don’t have enough experience. But how can these young people get experience when organisations don’t trust them enough to have them join?

Here are some ways that organisations can engage the youth:

1. Give Them Support 

youth support

Give youth support

Some engagement comes in the form of work placements but a lot of the time young people aren’t given the chance to showcase what exactly they can do. It is fair that some organisations don’t have enough trust. Small mistakes could just lead to bigger problems. But how can the youth be expected to learn and gain experience when they do not have the ability to do so. Giving time and support to young people goes a long way.

Lyfeproof UK is a good example of an organisation that helps youth development. The not for profit organisation dedicates time to help improve the lives of young people through creative means, such as poetry, music, film and food. They work with youth from primary school level up to 25 year olds.

2. Family 

family

Engage with families

Not only do organisations need to trust but they must gain trust from young people. If you’re trying to engage youth in an area where it’s not normalised perhaps try involving the whole of the family. Lyfeproof is again another example of a way of bringing families together as the organisation do engage with families as part of the solution for youth development.

Parents make good advocates and campaigners; they understand parents and they know other parents. We mostly trust our parents or carers, so connecting with parents will help to connect with young people. Netmums and Mumsnet are great examples of how parents can make positive differences in reaching other young people.

3. Give Time 

time support

Give time for youth

In our small poll with the young people from Birmingham and Black Country, a strong theme emerged; young people want flexibility. Not all young people have the same schedule. Some have school, some have part time jobs. Try not to limit when you want to engage with the youth; give time after school, in evenings, at the weekend. If you are flexible it gives more chances for young people to use their spare time to develop key skills. Setting taster sessions could also help them know what’s on offer, and you can use that time to figure out what days they prefer to engage. Don’t worry if the dates don’t suit everyone; it’s about inclusion and the trying.

4. Create a Youth Council 

youth

Support youth councils

By creating a youth council you are creating a board which is more or less made up of young people who advice organisations on matters that are relevant to young people. Having school councils in school is great and sets a very limiting few up to leadership roles (not all the time) but by encouraging this idea further outside of educational institutions young people will not only learn more from you and develop skills that will be beneficial to you, but they will actually achieve something. If there’s one thing that young people want it’s for their voice to be heard.

That’s All Media met with the Dudley Youth Council, a group of young people who represent the youth’s view. We covered the photography of their awards; we liked their work so much that we created this promotional video for them. This is an example of a positive way to engage with young people and help them lead their own campaigns in sustainable ways.

To reach target audiences, campaigners have to use flexible means. It’ll take trial and error, but make sure that young people are a part of your planning and decision making. They will save you time and bring you fresh ideas, after all they are the future.

Written By: Sania Chughtai

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

 

 

 

London Green Rush – Investment Boom From an Unlikely Source

Credit: Cxelf, Flickr

A London Green Rush could be lining the pockets of city investors very soon. In the big smoke, there is a different kind of smoke on their minds. With a cannabis industry booming across the pond in the US and Canada, investors are already looking overseas for their investment. However, there is speculation that a change in legislation in the UK could spark a huge market potentially worth £18billion in 10 years time.

There has been around £200million invested in medical marijuana companies overseas. It is worth noting that it is illegal for a UK investor to invest in a company that offers recreational cannabis. As Canada is due to legalise recreational marijuana on 17th October then this makes it tricky for UK investors to invest in Canadian marijuana companies with 100% positivity they won’t break the law. With Canada currently being the source of the biggest outflow of money into cannabis based companies, this could open up space.

Cannabis contains two main chemicals, THC and CBD. THC is what creates the psychoactive response, and CBD is now being introduced in products in the UK. CBD is legal in most forms and comes from hemp, which is a cannabis plant that is low THC and high CBD. Health stores such as Holland and Barrett now stock a range of CBD products.

GW Pharmaceuticals, based in Cambridge, has already won special licenses for the manufacturing of medicinal marijuana. They specialise in research, and also in products for the US. Which obviously helps the UK as it is an export.

According to Euromonitor the global cannabis market could be worth up to $150billion in the next decade. To put that in perspective the global coffee market is worth $100billion. Any investor who sees that prediction would be licking their lips. Through CBD, and maybe a change in legislation, the UK could be part of this growing market.

There are those like the family of Alfie Dingley campaigning for change. Alfie Dingley is a six-year-old boy with a rare form of epilepsy, one that can cause up to 3,000 seizures every year. They went to the Netherlands, where cannabis laws are more relaxed, and found that medical cannabis oils dramatically helped with his seizures, and were he to be administered with this he could come down to only 20 seizures a year. They applied for a special exception for their son, which was initially rejected. However, they have now been granted a special licence for using the drug after handing a petition to the Prime Minister. This comes following a similar case for a boy called Billy Caldwell, had his mum campaigning for change.

The United Patients Alliance (UPA) is an organisation founded by Clark French which campaigns for the use of medicinal cannabis and advocates on behalf of patients who, in their words, are ‘being criminalised for trying to be well’. They believe cases like Dingley and Caldwell are certainly a step in the right direction, however, more needs to be done to define medicinal cannabis if it is to be available to a wider market rather than having to go through parliament on a case by case basis.

Written By: Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Kew Gardens Want To Brighten Up Britain

Credit: Daniel Case

Grow Wild, in association with Kew Gardens, have funding applications open now for 2019. Grow Wild fund community projects that engage communities with the native wildflowers and fungi of the UK.

This is not for those living in the stunning countryside, but mostly for people from underprivileged urban areas, offering an opportunity to come together and brighten up their space.

It is known that there is a correlation between the amount of green space in an area and mental wellbeing. People are happier when they are around more nature. In built-up areas this may seem like an impossibility, but just a few plant pots or containers and people do start to feel better.

Being involved in a community project in a green space is socialising, is (hopefully) being in the sunshine, and being around a small section of nature which is undoubtedly good for you.

Grow Wild also focuses on youth, with projects for 12-25 year olds. These aren’t necessarily just giving kids some seeds to plant, they can involve art pieces, film, dance, anything really that celebrates the native botanicals of the UK.

If you have an idea for a green-fingered project then you can get in touch and apply for funding until 10th December 2018. The requirements are that it must have a focus on UK native wildflowers, plants or fungi. You need to have the potential to reach 300 people, and it should be something where people can connect, learn something new, and help each other and nature. Your project should also engage at least one of the following target audiences:

  • Young people aged 12-25
  • Communities living in urban areas
  • Communities experiencing some disadvantage or reduced access to services
  • Adults that are less engaged with their community and environmental activities

Application forms are on their website, go check it out.

Written by: Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Friends of the Flyover

The friends of Flyover – That’s All Media speaks with individuals championing the hidden fight for free arts in forgotten spaces.

If you were to give the task of listing festival venues, it is most likely that this would bring the stereotypical Glastonbury setup to the mind of the average person. City festivals are a completely different kettle of fish and even more so is the likes of one particular all day event which takes place under Birmingham’s Hockley Flyover. This is a large but barren space, frequently used but not made use of. The festival challenges the flyover’s role by bringing in a large stage, food stalls and business stands, a catalyst for a diverse community of people to come together and enjoy quality entertainment in an unusual space for free.

That's All Media supporting Flyover Festival

Under the Hockley Flyover at Flyover VIII

This year’s festival (Flyover VIII) included a set from the soulful songstress Ayanna Witter-Johnson and all round involvement of Soweto Kinch, the festival’s main man. As an attendee, the most notable elements were the diversity in artists and festival-goers and the high quality of performances despite the absence of an entry fee. Musical styles ranged from jazz to hip-hop, grime to reggae, providing a listening palette for just about every taste, and even branched out into other art forms with street dance performances amongst the crowds.

Speaking to the Friends of Flyover

That's All Media supporting Flyover Festival

Ken McLean (Chronicles of a Rastaman) at Flyover VIII

The event even attracted vloggers such as Ken McLean, who documents his travels on his youtube channel ‘Chronicles of a Rastaman’. He returns every year because ‘it always feels like home’ and not only sees Flyover as an opportunity to create quality content but as a chance to support his local community. However, it seems that attendees that return every year don’t always come for familiarity. Natalie Rogers (insta: @87_winks)brings her friends for a different kind of day out. She listed a number of reasons Flyover appealed to her including community feel, ‘really good music’, the unusual venue and diversity of people.

That's All Media supporting Flyover Festival

Saffron, Kameya and Rihanna at Flyover VIII

This diversity also spans across the age ranges. Saffron (age 8), Kameya (age 9) an Rihanna (age 11) had come for the afternoon with their parents. They told me that the music even appeals to them as youngsters and they couldn’t believe they get to come to an event like this for free. In a day and age when concerts can be expensive for young people, especially those who can’t attend unsupervised, something like Flyover can be a unique opportunity for them to experience live music. The only thing they said they would change about the event would be to provide ‘even more music’.

Artists Who Care

That's All Media supporting Flyover Festival

Black Symbol performing at Flyover VIII

This demand seems to be echoed not only through the attendance of the show but from the musicians too. Handsworth based ‘Black Symbol’ described Flyover Show’s success as down to the diversity of the musical styles and that it was set to become ‘one of the biggest shows in Birmingham’. If the audience and artist enthusiasm is anything to go by it may be that is already the case. Musicians were not only on stage but also there to listen. Oneke Tebbs is London based but doesn’t see the travel to Birmingham as too much of an obstacle to enjoy ‘good music in an unusual venue’. We had a long chat about how valuable a free event with quality of music like this is in a time where live performances are becoming scarily more scarce.

That's All Media supporting Flyover Festival

Family time at Flyover VIII

The Value of Free Arts

This sentiment seemed to be one held by a lot of the musicians and festival-goers at Flyover, who were all keen to show support to something so valuable happening in a space which would ordinarily seem to have very little value itself. It means that a diverse range of people now have something in common, a need for good music and good company. As Flyover VIII has drawn to a close, it only brings optimism for what future events might bring to the table.

That’s All Media works with brands causes and people to raise awareness of important social issues.

To discover other campaigns and campaigners for social good, see this article.

At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk

Care Leavers – The Necessity of a Support Network

According to Catch22, less than 1% of children are in care, yet almost a quarter of the adult prison population and almost half of young men under 21-years-old in the criminal justice system have spent time in care. Also, 25% of homeless people have been in care.

These statistics are clearly very disproportionate, so now the question is why? Barnardo’s tells us that in England 21% of children leaving care are as young as 16, 16% leave care at 17, and 62% at 18. The UK average for young people leaving home is 26. If you cast your mind back to when you were 16, do you honestly think you would be well prepared to enter adult life?

Even when people this young move out from their parent’s house, a lot of the time they continue to receive love, support, and even financial assistance to help guide them through the difficulties. The lack of this can end up with them getting involved in crime and drugs, which consequentially leads to them not going through education and achieving good qualifications. Only 6% of care leavers go on to higher education, as opposed to the 49% of the UK population that participate in university or some other form of HE.

Aspire4U is supporting the Dudley Children In Care and Care Leavers Youth Council to deliver the Dudley Children in Care Awards 2018. This is an important event in the Dudley Council social action calendar. A team of young people are delivering this event to mark the positive achievements of young people in care. The awards will also have categories for employers that have supported and prioritised care leavers. That’s All Media will be helping to film the event and develop a promotional video for more awareness.

Charities like Catch22, Barnardo’s, Care Leavers Association, and a wealth of others are all interested in tackling this issue. Someone needs to speak up for care leavers and they would love your help. You can even join a Facebook page here if you are a care leaver yourself and want to be part of a network, or just someone wanting to give their support for this great cause

Written by: Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Crowdfunder Set Up to Help Anti-Upskirting Activist

Gina Martin

In June 2017, Gina Martin was a victim of upskirting, which is when someone takes a photo up a woman’s skirt without them knowing. This act is still shockingly legal, and over one year on, Martin is still campaigning for that to change. Comedian Samantha Baines has now set up a crowdfunder in her honour, to help support her costs of fighting for meaningful change in the law.

In June of this year, the new legislation went through the House of Commons, but the bill was blocked by one vote. Gina hasn’t given up though, working tirelessly alongside a full-time job, and covering her own expenses, the bill is now ready to go through the House of Lords.

The crowdfunder is for people who believe in her mission, and to give her the help she needs. So many people have reached out to her, she knows she is not alone in this fight. We all hope this is one last push to make this violating act illegal.

Written by: Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Female Genital Mutilation – How Can We Help

Credit: Jessica Lea/DFID

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) has been reported on for a while now, and is often seen as a foreign issue. In the UK, there are over 65,000 cases of FGM, and an estimated 137,000 women and girls affected by the issue. In the US, only half of the states have legislation which makes the practice illegal despite over 500,000 women being at risk of FGM or the consequences.

FGM has no known medical benefits, and can potentially cause multiple health conditions from difficulty giving birth, infertility, or even death in some cases. The practice is around 2000 years old, and it is often only to keep in with tradition. However, when a tradition is this harmful, then we can agree that something must be done.

28 Too Many is a charity dedicated to changing this. They are named after the 28 countries in Africa where it is most commonly practiced. For more info about their strategy visit their website.

Written by: Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Google Joins JOMO Revolution

Scroll-free September is supported by That's All Media

Happy Scroll-Free September everyone! With FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) taking over our lives for the last few years, a new trend is on the way. JOMO (Joy Of Missing Out) is looking to take over, and Google is on board.

Tech giants Google have published an article detailing the results of extensive research conducted over the last few years indicating that people want less screen time. With smartphones transforming the way we live our lives, there is a debate to be had about whether these devices are improving our reality.

Google’s research has determined that people want help spending less time on their phones.

They are prepared to do this in three key moves.

Firstly, the new Android software will include a Digital Wellbeing Dashboard, which works similarly to YouTube’s recently launched Time Watched facility, and will show you how much time you use on each app.

Secondly, App Timer is being included on the new Android update also which will notify you after a set time period on one app to help stop the endless scrolling.

Thirdly, they will have partial disconnection, which will shut down most apps leaving only crucial ones (such as phone, camera, clock, maps).

Is it time to unplug from the matrix, and give time back to ourselves?

Scroll-free September is happening all of September with the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH), and is encouraged by That’s All Media.

Written by Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

Could a Pilot Shortage Help Social Mobility?

A pilot used to be a dream job, not any more. World leaders in aviation, CAE, have forecast that in the next 10 years the world will require 255,000 new pilots. Currently, around 20,000 new pilots are recruited per year, so the maths suggests it will not be enough unless something changes.

At the current rate there will be an obvious gap between pilots required and pilots available, so how can we fill that gap? Right now, around the world, only 5% of pilots are women, and 3% of pilots are people of colour. So this is a job market incredibly saturated by one demographic, so the opportunity is there to open up the field.

The older, less diverse, the baby boomer generation is reaching the mandatory retirement age of 65. So, as the years go by I would expect things to change in this industry as the young blood comes through.

There are other problems though, according to flightdeckfriend.com training to be a pilot means forking out £40,000 at the bare minimum, and can be up to a whopping £120,000 for the top courses. But compare that with the average salary of a pilot which is £79,000pa, and it suddenly doesn’t look as bad as my £50,000 student debt and the average salary of around £25,000 in my industry.

Roughly 50% of the required pilots for the next 10 years haven’t started their training yet, so if you’re not sitting in a cockpit reading this then don’t worry you can still go for it.

If you still want to live out your childhood dream of becoming a pilot then now is the best chance. The industry is going to be changing, and when change happens everyone is invited.

We’re supporting campaigners who see this situation as an opportunity for helping social mobility – with working class people getting opportunities to earn more and solve social problems. Even aviation schools like Herefordshire based Tiger Aviation are campaigning to bring this challenge to the fore. That’s All Media will be using our skills to help these campaigners to tell their stories.

Written by: Aiden Perrins

Need help communicating your social issue? At That’s All Media, we help brands, causes and people raise awareness of important social issues by producing high quality visual, written and voice (i.e. podcasts, voice-overs) content creation. We also enjoy social media management and long-term communications projects. For more on this contact jen@thatsallmedia.co.uk.

Want to write for us? Contact hello@thatsallmedia.co.uk and get in touch.

Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram

 

REACH OUT TO US